Great Colorado Hikes

I've been meaning to create this post for some time. There has been so many articles and references to Hanging Lake inside of Glenwood Canyon. This trail is popular among tourists because of it's location, turquoise lake and naturally formed waterfalls that flow into it. It is a relatively short hike and has been upgraded over over the years with a deck that circles the lake.

 Photo by boydhendrikse/iStock / Getty Images

Photo by boydhendrikse/iStock / Getty Images

Because of it's popularity, there is thoughts of restricting the traffic flow on the trail. This has been due to a number of reasons, mostly traffic but this year there was even vandalism that spurred closing it down to the public.

It is a beautiful hike, however I would like to turn you on to one of my personal favorites, Missouri Lakes. 

 A view from Missouri Lakes Basin.  

A view from Missouri Lakes Basin.  

The Missouri Lakes trail is located in the Holy Cross Wilderness, outside of Leadville, Colorado. It's a bit longer than some might hope, being about 3.5 miles to the basin but worth every step along the way. The trail follows Missouri creek from the very beginning and crosses a canyon, bringing you to a scenic meadows, cascades and small waterfalls until arriving at the basin itself with breathtaking views of the lakes, meadows and granite ridges and peaks surrounding  you. Need I say more. Check it out the next time you are looking for a worthy hiking trail.


The Misadventures on the road

Two weeks ago, I decided to visit Crested Butte.  I've never been there.  It's on my list of places in Colorado, I've never been, and wanted to go.  So having now been there what did I learn?  Crested Butte is awesome.  It's such a cool little town that is an outdoorsmans paradise, away from major roadways and high traffic trails.  

Crested Butte is the home of the bike.  If I was to guess where bikes originally came from it would be there.  Everyone in town was getting around on cruiser bikes, there was great roadbiking on the roads through the passes, and mountian bikes gallorre.  I was amazed that you could actually get around on cruisers, from home to town and back.  It made me jealous, here in the valley it's so hard to make that feasable with the hills and highways.  

The second thing I noticed is that I came across a huge amount of International Scouts.  If you don't know what a scout is, it's a 4 wheel drive truck that was introduced in the early 60s and produced the international Harvester corporation and manufactured them only until 1980. They are really cool looking precursors to the SUV, that featured a boxy look much like that of the early Bronco's and had removable hardtops.  For a truck that had a relatively short span of production, that stoped being produced more than 35 years ago, and to see 5 or 6 of them in one place seems crazy to me.  It's like if you owned a scout, it would automatically start driving and wouldnt stop until you got to Crested Butte.   Perhaps if you wanted to move there, you would have to fill out a questionare with one quesion, do you own or have you ever owned an international scout.  If you answer yes, boom, your automatically accepted.

One of the many Scouts I came accros in Crested Butte

Changing the subject slightly, and why I call it the misadventures on the road, I had to cut my visit short because weather.  For someone (myself) who usually is over-prepared for any situation, I was completely unprepared for how cold it was going to be.  It was the middle of August so I had a light sleeping bag.  Biiiiiig mistake.  I abandoned my tent, put on all the layers I had in my car and attempted unsuccessfully to sleep in my car.  So 6 in the morning, after about an hour of total sleep, I sat in my camping chair, in my sleeping bag, chugging coffee to warm up waiting for the sun to hit my face. As I waddled over to my tent, I shook the ice off the rainfly and said  not happening another night.  No way.  On the positive side, it was a beutiful camp spot, only about 10 minutes outside of town. 

So, to wrap this up, lesson learned, be prepared, be more than prepared and you will be ready for anything.  If you are like myself, and don't do well in extreme cold conditions, have lots of extra layers and always bring your warm sleeping bag.  Also, go exploring in these last few weeks of summer, there is nothing better, you never know what you will come across.  Enjoy the rest of the summer folks.  - Barry


From video content to video strategy

I was more than impressed when I watched this video presentation by Phil Nottingham in regards to video content to video strategy.  Many clients I work with recently have put a lot of effort into content-content-content.  Phil opened my eyes as to how this can actually harm your business instead of helping it.  He further explains how context should be king over content and how to strategically hit your audience with a direct strategy for web video.  

Well worth anyone's time!  Check it out!


Steadman's 25th Year

Dr. J. Richard Steadman and the Steadman Philippon Research Institute just celebrated their 25th year of research.   A large part of their program is taking Orthopaedic Resident's and teaching them the aspects of Sports Medicine in what is called a Fellowship Program.  Dr. Steadman began the Sports Medicine Fellowship Program and it has now grown to be one of the best in the world.  After having worked along side the institute for so long I am proud to have been able to produce this piece for them.

Updated Photo Gallery

A few photos have been added recently to the photo gallery.  The abstract photo collection was added.  A few great music shots were added of Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears, a few shots from some work down at Mesa Verde and a couple more Kayaking shots.  I hope you enjoy!

Kauhola Point and Malama Kai Foundation Project

It looks like the project was a success!  The following is a post from the Malama Kai Foundation blog:  

CONGRATULATIONS to the North Kohala community for their successful efforts in purchasing Kauhola Point.  This beautiful and important historic coastal area is now conserved in perpetuity!  Malama Kai Foundation is especially proud of the exemplary efforts of Elizabeth Pickett and Tom Loomis, Co-Directors of MKF’s Ocean Warriors Program, who worked diligently with Kauhola Point users and the community in bringing together all stakeholders under a shared vision.  Congratulations and Mahalo to all the Ocean Warriors kids who played a significant role and helped make this possible.  Go Ocean Warriors!!  Mahalo to everyone!